BOOK REVIEWS

High Impact Teams – Lance Witt

highLance Witt, High Impact Teams: Where Healthy Meets High Performance (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2018), 298 pp.

High Impact Teams by Lance Witt took me by complete surprise. Each year I read several books on leadership. On first glance, the book seemed a bit bland and appeared to offer very little in terms of practical help. But it only took about fifty pages for the author to warm up. Once the engines were revved up, he never looked back.

Lance Witt is a seasoned pastor who has served on large church staffs, including Saddleback Church. So Witt brings a wealth of experience to the table – and it shows. His insight and wisdom are evident throughout the book.

High Impact Teams is arranged in eight parts. Each part tackles a different facet of leadership and presents a wide range of options for church leaders.

The principles that Witt proposed are supercharged biblical realities that have the power to created high impact teams with optimal results. I commend High Impact Teams and trust that God will use it in a mighty way to encourage pastors and leaders for many years to come.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review.

BOOK REVIEWS · Leadership

Reagan On Leadership – James M. Strock (1998)

098407743X_lHe is the man who inspired the United States of America after four years of economic disaster in the Carter administration.  He is the man who called out a Communist leader as he stood before the  Brandenburg Gate in Germany.  He is the man who is largely responsible for the demise of the former Soviet Union.  He is the man who restored faith in the American ideal of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  His name – President Ronald Wilson Reagan.

President Reagan was a first-rate leader.  His approach to leadership emerges clearly in James Strock’s excellent project entitled, Reagan on Leadership: Executive Lessons From the Great Communicator.

Part one discusses President Reagan’s approach to Leadership.  The author notes the importance of crafting a compelling vision.  Anyone who is familiar with Ronald Reagan will admit that he was the master of vision casting.  Reagan’s leadership was tough and decisive.  He proposed policies with boldness and humility that was laced with a depth of character the many Americans relegate to the good ol’ days.

Part two discusses the Management philosophy of President Reagan.  A plaque that set on his desk in the Oval Office communicates the heart and soul of his approach to management: “There is no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he doesn’t mind who gets the credit.”  He repudiated a micro-management approach and was happy to delegate authority to his staff.    He said, “The way I work is to identify the problem, find the right individuals to do the job, and then let them go to it.”  So his management philosophy had an inherent trust in people.  His desire was to unleash the gifts and talents in others for the benefit of the American people.

Part three overviews Communication.  Of course, Reagan is best known as the great communicator.  In a poignant moment, the former President admitted, “I wasn’t a great communicator, but I communicated great things.”  And so the leader of the free world inspired Americans with lower taxes, a strong military, and a smaller government – three pillars that have all but crumbled under the current administration.

Part four focusses on Self-Management.  The author zeroes in on the character qualities of courage, authenticity, confidence, optimism, empathy, grace, charm, discipline, constancy, perseverance, and humility to name a few.  These are the marks that made the made.  The combined total of these characteristics shaped the man that we know as President Ronald Reagan.

Reagan on Leadership is a reminder that leadership matters.  It is a reminder that great men are great leaders.  It is a reminder that character matters; that leaders are made, not born.  This is a book that is greatly needed in our day and will help inspire the next generation of leaders committed to the rise of conservative values and policy.

BOOK REVIEWS · Leadership

Reagan on Leadership – James M. Strock (1998)

098407743X_lHe is man who inspired the United States of America after four years of economic disaster in the Carter administration.  He is the man who called out a Communist leader as he stood before the  Brandenburg Gate in Germany.  He is the man who is largely responsible for the demise of the former Soviet Union.  He is the man who restored faith in the American ideal of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  His name – President Ronald Wilson Reagan.

President Reagan was a first-rate leader.  His approach to leadership emerges clearly in James Strock’s excellent project entitled, Reagan on Leadership: Executive Lessons From the Great Communicator.

Part one discusses President Reagan’s approach to Leadership.  The author notes the importance of crafting a compelling vision.  Anyone who is familiar with Ronald Reagan will admit that he was the master of vision casting.  Reagan’s leadership was tough and decisive.  He proposed policies with boldness and humility that was laced with a depth of character the many Americans relegate to the good ol’ days.

Part two discusses the Management philosophy of President Reagan.  A plaque that set on his desk in the Oval Office communicates the heart and soul of his approach to management: “There is no limit to what a man can do or where he can go if he doesn’t mind who gets the credit.”  He repudiated a micro-management approach and was happy to delegate authority to his staff.    He said, “The way I work is to identify the problem, find the right individuals to do the job, and then let them go to it.”  So his management philosophy had an inherent trust in people.  His desire was to unleash the gifts and talents in others for a the benefit of the American people.

Part three overviews Communication.  Of course, Reagan is best known as the great communicator.  In a poignant moment, the former President admitted, “I wasn’t a great communicator, but I communicated great things.”  And so the leader of the free world inspired Americans with lower taxes, a strong military, and a smaller government – three pillars that have all but crumbled under the current administration.

Part four focusses on Self-Management.  The author zero’s in on the character qualities of courage, authenticity, confidence, optimism, empathy, grace, charm, discipline, constancy, perseverance, and humility to name a few.  These are the marks that made the made.  The combined total of these characteristics shaped the man that we know as President Ronald Reagan.

Reagan on Leadership is a reminder that leadership matters.  It is a reminder that great men are great leaders.  It is a reminder that character matters; that leaders are made, not born.  This is a book that is greatly needed in our day and will help inspire the next generation of leaders committed to the rise of conservative values and policy.

BOOK REVIEWS

Developing Emotionally Mature Leaders – Aubrey Malphurs

leadAubrey Malphurs, Developing Emotionally Mature Leaders Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2018 239 pp. $16.99

Developing Emotionally Mature Leaders by Aubrey Malphurs is designed with a specific purpose in mind – “to come up with a process or pathway that challenges Christian leaders to become more aware of, understand, and manage their emotions and those of others so that they can be emotionally mature leaders who relate well with and truly inspire.”

The book is arranged in three parts. Part One sets the stage by introducing readers to the concept of emotional intelligence (EI). Six assumptions about emotional intelligence undergird this section:

  1. Emotionally mature Christians are spiritually mature believers.
  2. The Godhead is characterized by emotions.
  3. The hope of the world is an emotionally mature church.
  4. Emotional intelligence is critically important to God-honoring leadership.
  5. Scripture undergirds the importance of emotional maturity.
  6. Emotions are central to what it means to be human and live life.

The author stresses the importance of emotions. “Great leaders,” writes Malphurs, “lead through the emotions. They move us. They ignite our passion and inspire the best in us.”

Part Two demonstrates the importance of emotional intelligence, which is defined as “an awareness of our emotions and the emotions of others around us so that we can handle well our emotions and theirs, with the result that we relate in a Christlike manner with those within or outside the body of faith.”

A biblical theology of emotions is presented and also includes a chapter that helps assess emotional maturity.

Part Three helps readers move forward in order to become emotionally mature. Several models are set forth here. Readers are encouraged to pick and choose the models that fit their unique situation.

Finally, this work includes an extensive set of appendices. A series of diagnostic tools are offered, which enable readers to honestly assess where they stand on the emotional intelligence continuum.

Summary

Developing Emotionally Mature Leaders effectively argues the necessity of managing one’s emotions and moving forward in a way that glorifies and pleases God. The theme of sanctifying grace runs through these pages and urges readers to pursue a life of holiness.

One disappointing development is the absence of any insight by Jonathan Edwards. I cannot think of anyone in church history who more adequately addressed the matter of the affections. Jettisoning the fine work of Edwards is a critical oversight.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review.

BOOK REVIEWS

Spurgeon on the Christian Life – Michael Reeves (2018)

spurMichael Reeves, Spurgeon on the Christian Life. Wheaton: Crossway, 2018, 181 pp. 192 $14.95

Spurgeon on the Christian Life by Michael Reeves is the latest installment in the Crossway Series, Theologians on the Christian Life. This excellent book covers some basic biographical information on the Prince of Preachers. He is rightly described as a man who “went at all of life full-on.” Spurgeon was a man of “deep affections.” Reeves is quick to characterize Spurgeon as a man of deep joy and God-centered wisdom.

Spurgeon was a man who possessed a strong reverence for Christ and his Word. A fair amount of space is devoted to showing how Spurgeon made Christ central in his life and his pastoral ministry: “You cannot taste the sweetness of any doctrine till you have remembered Christ’s connection with it,” writes Spurgeon. He was a man who was gripped by the Bible which is evident to anyone who reads his sermons.

Spurgeon was cut from the cloth of the Puritans. This man was a Calvinist through and through. Reeves adds, “Spurgeon was a Puritan and a Calvinist not through adherence to any theological system or tradition as such but because he believed such theology most glorifies Christ.” But Spurgeon never got boxed in by his theological systems. Above all, he was a Christian: “We believe in the five great points commonly known as Calvinistic; but we do not regard those five points as being barbed shafts which we are to thrust between the ribs of our fellow-Christians. We look upon them as being five great lamps which help to irradiate the cross; or, rather five great emanations springing from the glorious covenant of our Triune God, and illustrating the great doctrine of Jesus crucified.”

Reeves labors to explore the essence of Spurgeon’s preaching. The general purpose of his preaching is explored and his exegetical habits are examined. Spurgeon’s first aim in the pulpit was to clearly and faithfully preach Christ crucified. The author remarks, “If he is to be preached faithfully, the Christ who is the light and glory of God must be preaching by clearly and beautifully.” This is the kind of preaching that marked the ministry of C.H. Spurgeon.

Spurgeon’s passion for doctrine appears through this work with an emphasis on regeneration, conversion, human inability, sanctification, and the cross of Christ. “The cross,” writes Spurgeon, “that deepest revelation of the glory of God – is the great weapon that breaks down the heart’s defenses.”

Dr. Reeves presents an honest appraisal of Spurgeon. He was a man of prayer. But he was also a man who battled most of his adult life with despondency and depression. This leads to what may very well be the most important feature of the book, namely, the emphasis on fighting for joy. In one sentence, Reeves articulates Spurgeon’s heart on this matter with deep insightfulness: “Christians must, then, fight for joy, and fight for that intimacy with God that fosters joy. Such is the warp and woof of the Christian life that Spurgeon lived so well.

One may wonder how such a book could make any significant contribution, especially in light of some very good recent publications that survey the life and ministry of Spurgeon. Books like Living By Revealed Truth by Tom Nettles, The Forgotten Spurgeon by Iain Murray, Spurgeon’s Sorrows by Zach Eswine, and most recently, Steal Away Home by Matter Carter and Aaron Ivey have uncovered a wealth of information about the Prince of Preachers. But Spurgeon on the Christian Life is a helpful addition, indeed. This very readable book presents Spurgeon in an honest light which glorifies the great God of the universe. Readers would be remiss to ignore this precious treasure!

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review.

BOOK REVIEWS

When Your Church Feels Stuck – Chris Sonksen (2017)

stuckChris Sonksen, When Your Church Feels Stuck: 7 Unavoidable Questions Every Leader Must Answer Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2017, 181 pp. $10.80

Many churches in America are sitting on the plateau – so Chris Sonksen’s book, When Your Church Feels Stuck is relevant and fills an important need. The author sets forth an important principle at the outset: God determines the talent but we determine the choices. That is, are we faithful with the resources that God has given us? Sonksen remarks, “The measure of success is based on your living up to your potential, doing the absolute best you can o with what you have been given, digging deeper into your heart and soul, and seeking to become the leader God intended you to be.”

Several questions are offered which assess attitudes:

  • Am I doing all I can to reach my God-given potential?
  • Do I seek out people to mentor me or do I let pride get in the way?
  • Am I open to change or stuck in tradition?
  • Has ministry become more of a career than a calling?
  • Do I hold on too tightly to past successes?
  • Have I gotten too comfortable with the way things are?
  • Is everyone else recognizing a problem except me?

The author presents different stages in the life of a church from the initial launch, to utopia, whirlwind, increase, merry-go-round, and slow death. Readers are encouraged to evaluate which stage their respective church is currently in.

Most of the book revolves around seven questions, which are outlined below:

  1. Mission: What do we do?
  2. Strategy: How do we get it done?
  3. Values: What are the guiding principles we live by?
  4. Metrics: How do we measure a win?
  5. Team Alignment: Do we have the right people in the right seats moving in the right direction?
  6. Culture: How do we change the culture of our church?
  7. Services: How do we match what we say is important and what we really do?

The author goes into more detail as each question frames a specific chapter. The seven questions are helpful diagnostic tools and should be carefully considered by pastors and church leaders.

While nothing harmful is presented in Sonksen’s work, I would prefer to see a more biblically faithful model. Such work is found, for instance, in Andrew Davis’s book, Revitalize: Biblical Keys to Helping Your Church Come Alive Again. The work under consideration may help jumpstart a struggling church. However, it fails to provide the robust biblical groundwork to help a church move forward in a Gospel-centered way. My fear is that a business model is slowly replacing the biblical model, which is presented in the pages of the New Testament.

My assessment of this work is mixed. Readers should proceed cautiously, refusing to throw the baby out with the bathwater. But they should also realize that there is no “magic bullet” for church growth or revitalization in the local church.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review.

BOOK REVIEWS

When Fish Fly: Lessons For Creating a Vital and Energized Workplace (2004)

when fish flyJohn Yokoyama and Joseph Michelli. When Fish Fly: Lessons For Creating a Vital and Energized Workplace. New York: Hyperion Books, 2004. 158 pp. $14.63

Whenever I have the chance to take a guest to Seattle, one of the first places on the list is Pike Place Market. Anyone that knows anything about Pike Place knows that the tour would be incomplete without visiting the World Famous Pike Place Fish Market. Each guest has a chance to see fresh salmon flying through the air. The seafood acrobatics are matched by an enthusiastic team committed to fulfilling the vision of the market. But there’s nothing fishy about this Seattle-based company. Everything that unfolds before the guests is carefully thought out. The details are revealed in the book When Fish Fly: Lessons For Creating a Vital and Energized Workplace by John Yokoyama and Joseph Michelli.

When Fish Fly is an inside look at the success of the Pike Place Fish Market. The authors work through eight foundational pillars which drive the business plan:

  1. Creating a vision of power and possibility as a team.
  2. Enrolling and formalizing individual commitment and team alignment to the vision.
  3. Helping team members distinguish between the state of being and the state of doing.
  4. Having the leadership redefine themselves as effective agents of change.
  5. Assisting team members in letting go of internal and external conversations that rob them of their personal power.
  6. Guiding team members to listen to make a difference instead of listening to defend or blame.
  7. Helping the crew live their commitment to one another through effective coaching.
  8. Assisting crew members as they turn snags into breakthroughs.

Each of the business principles is explained and explored in greater detail. Yokoyama’s tale is sure to inspire new entrepreneurs and veteran business people alike. There are many nuggets here to mull over ruminate on. But the one thing that stands above all is the commitment the author to people. The author is more concerned with influencing people than a financial payout. Yokoyama writes,

“All of us can come together and benefit from generating bold visions of the future. You have an opportunity to positively empower people … I invite you to create a powerful vision for yourself and others in your community.”

When Fish Fly is a worthy read for anyone who has a passion to make a difference in the lives of people. Well done, Mr. Yokoyama!

Leadership

Embracing Followership

Allen Hamlin Jr, Embracing Followership: How to Thrive in a Leader-Centric Culture. Bellingham: Kirkdale Press, 2016, 237 pp. $14.99

True leaders will always have followers. At the heart of leadership is the assumption that a certain group of people is committed to following a given leader. Most books that address leadership focus on role of the leader, exclusively. Allen Hamlin’s new book, Embracing Followership: How to Thrive in a Leader-Centric Culture takes a different approach.

Hamlin tackles the opposite end of the leadership spectrum by focusing on what it means to follow. The goal of the book, then, is to “determine how we can engage in our followership role with excellence.”

Embracing Followership is organized into six parts. Each part examines a different facet of what it means to “follow” with integrity and excellence. The parts are outlined below:

Part One: Misconceptions and Realities of Followership

Part Two: The Opportunities of Followership

Part Three: Obstacles and How to Overcome Them

Part Four: Followership in Relationship with Leaders

Part Five: Followership in Relationship with Other Followers

Part Six: Followership in Relationship as a Leader

Uses

Followers from a wide variety of backgrounds will benefit from Hamlin’s work. Pastors serving in associate roles will find this material especially useful. As one who served as an associate pastor for twenty years, I can testify that this role in particular will define the true nature of followership. Associate pastors have a choice: They can tuck under the authority of their superior by supporting, defending, and complementing them. Or they can subtly undercut and marginalize senior leadership. The former option is the only path to success.

Followers are in a strategic position where they can enhance a given leader’s ability to succeed. Hamlin observes, “When I am behind and alongside my leader, I have the opportunity to contribute where my leader is lacking.”

The theme of embracing followership is an empowering concept that every person needs to build into the fabric of their lives. It is a an important theme that is underemphasized in leadership circles. Hamlin’s work is a needed corrective to a misunderstood and neglected subject.

One critique may be in order. While Hamlin is clear about his Christian commitment, the book appears to target a broader audience, which is understandable. However, whenever Christian presuppositions are minimized, the force of the content lacks the authoritative punch that readers need. This criticism aside, I recommend Embracing Followership and hope this work receives a wide reading.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review.

BOOK REVIEWS · Leadership

THE NAVY SEAL ART OF WAR – Rob Roy (2015)

Former Navy SEAL, Rob Roy was inspired by Sun Tzu’s, The Art of 0804137757_bWar.  The result is a book of his own: The Navy Seal Art of War.  The book is filled with over fifty chapters of leadership inspiration.

Rob Roy shares a wealth of leadership tips from his years in the military in The Navy Seal Art of War.  Each chapter contains a short but powerful meditation that will help anyone who aspires to influence others.  The author writes, “Real leaders inspire, direct, guide, and give hope.”  The book delivers as promised.

Roy’s book addresses various leadership topics like planning, mentoring, human resources, mental toughness, devotion, faithfulness, loyalty, and hard work.  Leaders from all walks of life will appreciate the approach here.  It is a good day to learn a few lessons from the world’s most elite fighting force.

Here are a few examples:

The Essential Seven

Extraordinary teams have a clear leader.

Extraordinary teams have quantifiable goals.

Extraordinary teams have well-defined roles.

Extraordinary teams share resources.

Extraordinary teams communicate effectively.

Extraordinary teams are 100 percent committed.

Extraordinary teams discourage big egos.

Mental Toughness

Be decisive.  Move quickly.

Don’t let stress result in your blaming others.

Don’t let distraction  deter you from accomplishing your objectives.

Never “take yourself out of the game.”  Always stay positive.

Under stress, good leaders learn how to compartmentalize tasks so they don’t get overwhelmed and shut down.

Stay focused on the mission.  Don’t let fatigue or stress deter your focus.

I received this book free from the publisher.   I was not required to write a positive review. 

3.5 stars

BOOK REVIEWS · Leadership

TAKE COMMAND – Jake Wood (2014)

“The key to relentless execution, quite simply, is the consistent and conscious choice 9780804138390_bof success over failure.  It is living your personal life and leading your professional life in a way that acknowledges that when the stakes are high, the only thing that moves the needle from failure to success is the right attitude.”  Jake Wood points leaders in the right direction with such a mindset in his book, Take Command.

A former Marine sniper turned businessman, Jake Wood shares his life experiences with readers with a systematic approach which is easy to read and apply to daily life situations.

The author presents eight lessons for leaders.  These lessons are not mere theory; these lessons were forged on the battlefield and the business world.  Relevant quotes from famous military leaders are found throughout the book.

The lessons are organized in four broad categories – prepare, analyze, decide, and act. Wood’s life experiences in the military and business world make the life lessons come alive.  His approach is humble and inviting.  There is no pretense here; only common sense principles for anyone who seeks to become a better leader.

I received this book free from the publisher.   I was not required to write a positive review. 

3.5 stars